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Chatswood Mandarin – 61-65 Albert Ave, Chatswood NSW 2067

Overall: Tiniest parent room ever!!! Funky stores, but a terrible place for anyone with children and a pram. 

Good Points: A parent room. Elevator access. Bottle warmer. Sink with soap and water. Cute pictures on one of the walls. Nappy bins and paper towel dispenser. A single chair.

Bad Points: The room is too tiny for pretty much anything. Located on 3rd level. Elevator and escalator are narrow. A single, tiny flat bench barely big enough for a nappy bag. No food prep space. Too small for a pram. One uncomfortable plastic chair. Door chocked open with general rubbish bin. No change table or change bench.

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This is probably the smallest, most inaccessible parent room I’ve ever seen. The Mandarin Centre has funky shops with cute and quirky gear for kids, but it is absolutely appalling when it comes to providing decent and useful parent room facilities.

The parent room is on Level 3. You won’t find one on Ground, Level 1 or 2. Nope, the only parent room I found is on Level 3. It’s not easy to get to this Level either, especially if you have a pram. There is an escalator and an elevator, but both are quite narrow. This is just the beginning of the difficulties.

The signs indicating a parent room offer such promise, but the end destination is a massive disappointment. The parent room door can be locked, but as the door had been chocked open by a big general rubbish bin, it looks like it’s meant to stay open. This is quite strange, and if anyone can enlighten me as to why this room is meant to have the door stay open, I’d love to know.

Actually, I think I’ve just realised why the door is kept open. It’s impossible to fit a pram in here with the door open let alone closed. The parent room is basically a tile broom cupboard – it’s that small!!! There is a teeny bench which has barely enough room for a nappy bag, let alone being able to change a baby on it (no chance at all). The sink is set into the bench, with a soap unit above it. On the opposite wall there is a paper towel unit, and all the bins are just underneath it. Apart from a single plastic chair taken from the food court, there is nothing in here to really help a parent look after the needs of their child at all. I don’t understand this. Why not at least have a fold out baby change table? That would be the least one could expect.

If you’re shopping with babies and intend on going to the Mandarin Centre, I’d say avoid it. Head to Westfield instead, at least for when you need to feed and change the little ones anyway.

 

Sydney International Airport – Departures Level

Overall: Good. Nappy change, rest, feed, toilets.

Good Points: Easy to find. Two private feeding cubicles, with locking doors, couch/armchair, foldout change tables. Adult and child size toilets. Additional powerpoints. Lots of bench space. Clean and working microwave. Big sink, with soap dispenser.

Bad Points: Narrow door way to cubicles. Manual door to parent room. Harsh lighting and plain colours. One toilet roll for both toilets.

Home » Sydney International Airport - Departures Level » Sydney International Airport
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The Departures Level of the Sydney International Airport has a pretty good parent room. It’s loads better than what’s available at the Domestic Terminals, thank goodness. We weren’t too sure where to find the parent room, but after checking in for our flight, we asked one of the Airport Volunteers who directed us to the bathrooms. The parent room is just past the duty free stores, past the check in counters. Follow the signs and you find it easily.

Having experienced quite poor parent rooms at Domestic Airports across the country, our hopes weren’t high regarding the quality of facilities here. However, we were actually quite surprised.

The parent room has two private feeding/change cubicles, a separate toilet room with both adult and child size toilets. Plus there is a microwave, big sink, soap dispenser, loads of bench space and additional powerpoints all in the main area of the room. This is really a good place to grab a bit of quiet time with bub before heading off on your overseas adventure.

While the lighting is harsh, and the colours very much in the style of uniform public bathrooms, the parent room does have all the things you need to look after your little ones. Each private cubicle has a door that locks from the inside. There is a wall mounted, fold out change table in each cubicle, plus a big comfy armchair. This is really good. We were expecting hard plastic chairs, so finding armchairs was just lovely.

The toilet room door also locks from the inside, and has both adult and child size toilets (perfect for kids learning to use the loo on their own). The only problem here is there is one toilet paper roll for both toilets, and it’s on the side of the adult loo. Adding an extra roll on the size of the kids toilet would be very handy.

The main area of the parent room has loads of bench space. Yay for being able to keep bags off the floor! Above the sink is a microwave which was clean and in working order. At one end of the bench there’s additional powerpoints, and at the other end is a massive sink plus soap dispenser. Seriously, the sink is big enough to rinse off a baby that has had a number 3 (those of you who have experienced a #3, know what we mean).

Check out the photos! Keep it in mind the next time you’re heading overseas with the kids. You’ll be glad you remembered!

 

Satellite Cafe, Newtown, tells mum that breastfeeding is an ‘offence to humanity’

Haven’t business owners learnt anything from recent events?

Yet another mother has been confronted by the owner of a cafe in Newtown, telling her breastfeeding is an ‘offence to humanity’. What a nasty thing to say!

I can’t imagine there will be too many mothers frequenting Satellite cafe anymore. Vote with your feet, people.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/cafe-chides-mother-for-offence-to-humanity-20130225-2f2b1.html